PRODUCT INFO

QC Flooring is a composite steel and concrete slab system with a neat ceiling, pre-painted or ready for painting underside. It provides added flexibility in that the cover width may be customised to suit the floor design.

QC panels provide the following features:

  • Shutter – supporting the mass of the wet concrete and construction loads.

  • Tensile reinforcement – resulting in a composite section with the concrete.

  • Finished ceiling – ready for painting with PVA compound QC panels are easy to erect and the system is adaptable to steel, concrete and brick structures. Provision can easily be made for electrical and mechanical services.

  • QC panels are easy to erect and the system is adaptable to steel, concrete and brick structures. Provision can easily be made for electrical and mechanical services.

ILLUSTRATIONS

QC Flooring
QC Flooring

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SPECIFICATIONS

The permanent formwork shall be QC Flooring 54/250, 54mm deep x 250mm wide with Z275 spelter Galvanised deep troughed interlocking Commercial Quality steel units/panels

  • Standard QC Flooring units/panels or QC Flooring Un-propped/Propless units/panels.

  • Un-propped or Propless QC Panel dimension DEPTH / WIDTH varies.

  • QC Units are available in a Plain or Embossed finish.

 

QC Flooring is available in Galvanised Z275 Spelter steel 1.0mm, 1.2mm, 1.6mm and 2.0mm thick.

QC Flooring is also available in 1.0mm or 1.2mm thick Galvanised Z275 spelter material with a Chromadek® paint finish on the one side and a Pebble Grey backer on the reverse side.

Concrete

Unless otherwise stated by the Engineer, the concrete shall have a minimum cube compressive strength of 25MPa at 28 days. Materials, mixing, placing and curing of concrete shall be following SANS 10100-2: 1992, or following the Engineer’s specification. Concrete used with QC panels shall not contain chloride salts or other deleterious material. No load shall be applied until the concrete has reached its required strength.

 

Composite Slab Design

Calculations are based on the Limit State Method (SANS 10100-1: 2000).